Editorial: Is adaptability the biggest issue for Inter?Editorial: Is adaptability the biggest issue for Inter?

Editorial: Is adaptability the biggest issue for Inter?Editorial: Is adaptability the biggest issue for Inter?-->
<!--:en-->Editorial: Is adaptability the biggest issue for Inter?<!--:--><!--:sv-->Editorial: Is adaptability the biggest issue for Inter?<!--:-->
March 16, 2013 21:07
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Branca01

Ben Boucher continues to deliver editorials for SempreInter.com and this time he’s wondering if Inters biggest issue is adaptability?

In a World where economies across the globe continue to suffer and businesses in every country go insolvent with frightening regularity, I thought I’d delve a little deeper into Inter’s transfer deals, the thought process behind them and whether the insistence that Inter can’t compete on a level playing field with top European sides due to financial constraints is a fact or an excuse. The backdrop to Inter’s recent transfer activity is well known, after years of budgets being assembled with a ‘win at all costs’ mentality Inter reached a point during Jose Mourinho’s tenure where their wage bill per player was ranked in the top five amongst sports teams on the entire planet. It is hard to criticise an owner who wants his team to win and facilitates that with his own money. Massimo Moratti has been quoted that during this period in Inter’s history some decisions were taken ‘as a fan’ rather than a businessman. After the treble in 2010 talk of financial fair play dominated the football landscape, set against the backdrop of a financial crisis the likes of which we haven’t seen since the Great Depression in the early 1900’s. Inter were slow to react, despite substantial offers for three or four of their top players they entered the 2010/11 season with the Triplete squad largely intact. Mario Balotelli had departed for Manchester City but the majority of players remained including Wesley Sneijder who had his contract renewed on increased terms (a decision that would later come back to bite Inter).

During the 2010/11 season management slowly began to realise that an ageing, expensive squad was unsustainable without the success of the previous seven years. Large contracts were not relative to the performance of the players on the field and with financial fair play about to start in earnest the situation needed to be addressed. It is at this point things began to unravel for Inter, Leonardo departed as coach and after the season Samuel Eto’o was sold to big spending Anzhi. The replacements for Eto’o were low cost options and worked out disastrously. On the field, the team failed to qualify for the Champions League after the 2011/12 campaign and despite many coaching and personnel changes the only thing Inter seemed to be succeeding at was cutting down the cost of their first team squad.

So here we are at ‘year zero’ as Massimo Moratti stated before the season, a young hungry coach with a squad which would not only cost less but had the promise of significant improvement going forward. The sales of Wesley Sneijder and young Phillippe Coutinho are well documented but it may surprise many that the total amount spent during the summer and January mercato’s stands at around €63.25 million. The difference between sales and purchase currently stands at around -€20.20 million. During this period it must also be taken into account that Inter saved around €45 million by reducing the contracts of certain players and reaching deals with the likes of Maicon, Lucio and Julio Cesar to leave the club. Without the official accounts some of these figures will be slightly different so please bear that in mind.

After a disastrous Europa League outing at Tottenham and a flat, unconvincing display against Bologna the finger pointing has started to intensify. Everybody has had their say, from the experts in the media to ex players and even Moratti himself. The consensus from all is extremely similar though: This squad is simply not good enough. Making allowances for injuries, Andrea Stramaccioni’s inexperience and the fatigue caused by such an early start to the season the calibre of player acquired for this testing period must be brought into question. There are of course exceptions to the rule, Palacio, Cassano, Gurain and in particular Samir Handanovic have proved their worth while the main signing of January Mateo Kovacic seems to have all the attributes needed to succeed at Inter. Too often though the signings made to assist the team have failed to provide the manager with adequate options.

Silvestre, Kuzmanovic, Pereira, Schelotto and Rocchi cost Inter a combined €19.03 million taking loan fees into account. This also excludes the value of Livaja in the deal with Atalanta for Schelotto. Even from these figures which are by no means official it’s pretty clear Inter didn’t get value for money. It would be unfair to suggest Inter could have signed this player or that player as making decisions in real time are never easy but for those transfer fees alone Inter could have purchased a selection of the following. The Villarreal pair of Borja Valero & Gonzalo Rodriguez costing a combined €8.6 million, Jackson Martinez and Moussa Sissoko for a combined €11.40 million. Arouna Kone (Who I considered the perfect Vice Milito last summer) would have set you back just €3.95 million. The list goes on and not just from one club or country, Tottenham secured Jan Vertonghen and Lewis Holtby for a combined €14.5 million while in Germany Dante, Affelay, Bastos and Sahin could have been bought or loaned for under €10 million. I’m not attempting to play Football Manager here, I am sure there was a valid reason why Inter couldn’t sign any of these players and many will argue if and how they would improve Inter but the fact remains the club are not getting value for money in the market.

Massimo Moratti was quoted this week “Management needs to be more adaptable, more alert and more ready. If a player that is not playing up to the standards of others, it is not only his fault. It is not only the fault of the players. We (management) are a part of it”. I strongly believe that if there aren’t any changes at the technical level Inter can’t get back to where they want to be. Many have called for the head of Marco Branca but it is his department that is having problems not just him as an individual. I tend to think about it like this: Inter were able to shop in a top store like Harrods, often the produce selected was delicious (look at many transfers during the period of success). The problem facing Inter now however is that to form a delicious product they can no longer shop in a luxury establishment. So my point is this, many lower quality supermarkets are successful without using the same produce and employees that a luxury establishment can afford, it is time for Inter to recognise that the people who created a delicious mix which lead to the Triplete side may not have the ability to find that same exquisite taste while shopping at a lower grade store. ‘Adapt or die’ is the infamous quote from Oakland A’s GM Billy Beane in Moneyball, at the moment it feels like Inter are doing the latter.

*Figures taken from http://www.transfermarkt.co.uk/ and verified with reported costs.Branca01

Ben Boucher continues to deliver editorials for SempreInter.com and this time he’s wondering if Inters biggest issue is adaptability?

In a World where economies across the globe continue to suffer and businesses in every country go insolvent with frightening regularity, I thought I’d delve a little deeper into Inter’s transfer deals, the thought process behind them and whether the insistence that Inter can’t compete on a level playing field with top European sides due to financial constraints is a fact or an excuse. The backdrop to Inter’s recent transfer activity is well known, after years of budgets being assembled with a ‘win at all costs’ mentality Inter reached a point during Jose Mourinho’s tenure where their wage bill per player was ranked in the top five amongst sports teams on the entire planet. It is hard to criticise an owner who wants his team to win and facilitates that with his own money. Massimo Moratti has been quoted that during this period in Inter’s history some decisions were taken ‘as a fan’ rather than a businessman. After the treble in 2010 talk of financial fair play dominated the football landscape, set against the backdrop of a financial crisis the likes of which we haven’t seen since the Great Depression in the early 1900’s. Inter were slow to react, despite substantial offers for three or four of their top players they entered the 2010/11 season with the Triplete squad largely intact. Mario Balotelli had departed for Manchester City but the majority of players remained including Wesley Sneijder who had his contract renewed on increased terms (a decision that would later come back to bite Inter).

During the 2010/11 season management slowly began to realise that an ageing, expensive squad was unsustainable without the success of the previous seven years. Large contracts were not relative to the performance of the players on the field and with financial fair play about to start in earnest the situation needed to be addressed. It is at this point things began to unravel for Inter, Leonardo departed as coach and after the season Samuel Eto’o was sold to big spending Anzhi. The replacements for Eto’o were low cost options and worked out disastrously. On the field, the team failed to qualify for the Champions League after the 2011/12 campaign and despite many coaching and personnel changes the only thing Inter seemed to be succeeding at was cutting down the cost of their first team squad.

So here we are at ‘year zero’ as Massimo Moratti stated before the season, a young hungry coach with a squad which would not only cost less but had the promise of significant improvement going forward. The sales of Wesley Sneijder and young Phillippe Coutinho are well documented but it may surprise many that the total amount spent during the summer and January mercato’s stands at around €63.25 million. The difference between sales and purchase currently stands at around -€20.20 million. During this period it must also be taken into account that Inter saved around €45 million by reducing the contracts of certain players and reaching deals with the likes of Maicon, Lucio and Julio Cesar to leave the club. Without the official accounts some of these figures will be slightly different so please bear that in mind.

After a disastrous Europa League outing at Tottenham and a flat, unconvincing display against Bologna the finger pointing has started to intensify. Everybody has had their say, from the experts in the media to ex players and even Moratti himself. The consensus from all is extremely similar though: This squad is simply not good enough. Making allowances for injuries, Andrea Stramaccioni’s inexperience and the fatigue caused by such an early start to the season the calibre of player acquired for this testing period must be brought into question. There are of course exceptions to the rule, Palacio, Cassano, Gurain and in particular Samir Handanovic have proved their worth while the main signing of January Mateo Kovacic seems to have all the attributes needed to succeed at Inter. Too often though the signings made to assist the team have failed to provide the manager with adequate options.

Silvestre, Kuzmanovic, Pereira, Schelotto and Rocchi cost Inter a combined €19.03 million taking loan fees into account. This also excludes the value of Livaja in the deal with Atalanta for Schelotto. Even from these figures which are by no means official it’s pretty clear Inter didn’t get value for money. It would be unfair to suggest Inter could have signed this player or that player as making decisions in real time are never easy but for those transfer fees alone Inter could have purchased a selection of the following. The Villarreal pair of Borja Valero & Gonzalo Rodriguez costing a combined €8.6 million, Jackson Martinez and Moussa Sissoko for a combined €11.40 million. Arouna Kone (Who I considered the perfect Vice Milito last summer) would have set you back just €3.95 million. The list goes on and not just from one club or country, Tottenham secured Jan Vertonghen and Lewis Holtby for a combined €14.5 million while in Germany Dante, Affelay, Bastos and Sahin could have been bought or loaned for under €10 million. I’m not attempting to play Football Manager here, I am sure there was a valid reason why Inter couldn’t sign any of these players and many will argue if and how they would improve Inter but the fact remains the club are not getting value for money in the market.

Massimo Moratti was quoted this week “Management needs to be more adaptable, more alert and more ready. If a player that is not playing up to the standards of others, it is not only his fault. It is not only the fault of the players. We (management) are a part of it”. I strongly believe that if there aren’t any changes at the technical level Inter can’t get back to where they want to be. Many have called for the head of Marco Branca but it is his department that is having problems not just him as an individual. I tend to think about it like this: Inter were able to shop in a top store like Harrods, often the produce selected was delicious (look at many transfers during the period of success). The problem facing Inter now however is that to form a delicious product they can no longer shop in a luxury establishment. So my point is this, many lower quality supermarkets are successful without using the same produce and employees that a luxury establishment can afford, it is time for Inter to recognise that the people who created a delicious mix which lead to the Triplete side may not have the ability to find that same exquisite taste while shopping at a lower grade store. ‘Adapt or die’ is the infamous quote from Oakland A’s GM Billy Beane in Moneyball, at the moment it feels like Inter are doing the latter.

*Figures taken from http://www.transfermarkt.co.uk/ and verified with reported costs.

By Editorial Staff
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